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FAQ's: Title IX

The following are frequently asked questions in regard to Title IX and related policies:

What conduct is prohibited by Title IX?

Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender (sex). Title IX prohibited conduct includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual misconduct, relationship (dating) violence and stalking.

What are a University’s obligations when it has notice of a Title IX related incident?

The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) issued a “Dear Colleague Letter (DCL)” on April 4, 2011 to educational institutions receiving federal aid. The DCL outlined institutions’ responsibilities with regard to student-on-student reports of sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual misconduct, relationship (dating) violence and stalking. The DCL states, “If a school knows or reasonably should know about student-on-student harassment that creates a hostile environment, Title IX requires the school to take immediate action to eliminate the harassment, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects.”

Who is Stanford University's Title IX Coordinator?

Sallie Kim, Interim Title IX Coordinator
(650) 497-4955
titleix@stanford.edu

What is the significance of the Title IX Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) issued by the Department of Education Office for Civil Rights on April 4, 2011?

The Title IX DCL outlines the requirements of Title IX, emphasizing that Title IX covers sexual violence and reminds schools of their responsibility to take immediate and effective steps to eliminate the harassment, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects.

What are the reporting obligations of residential staff (RA, PHE, RCC, RF, CM, etc.) when they have notice and/or report of a Title IX related incident?

All Stanford University employees, including student staff employed in campus residences, must report all Title IX related concerns to their Residence Dean. The Residence Dean will notify the Office of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse Education and Response (SARA) of the incident and meet with the Impacted Party to assist with immediate safety accommodations and resources as needed and appropriate.

What if the Impacted Party requests confidentiality?

All Stanford employees (including residential staff) must report Title IX related concerns to a University administrator as stated in Stanford’s Title IX Policy. Only persons who, by law, have special professional status (University mental and medical health professionals and University clergy) may keep Title IX related reports confidential. The Title IX Coordinator or designee will meet with the Impacted Party when possible to provide information about a Title IX Investigation. A copy of the Title IX Policy and a list of resources will be provided to the Impacted Party. Before beginning an investigation, the Title IX Coordinator will contact the Impacted Party and request consent from the Impacted Party to proceed to an investigation.  If the Impacted Party does not give consent for an investigation, the University will weigh the Impacted Party’s request for confidentiality in determining whether to proceed to an investigation. In some instances, to protect the safety of the Stanford community, an investigation may still go forward even if the Impacted Party refuses consent.

Whom can a student contact if she or he wants to discuss a sexual harassment, sexual assault or sexual misconduct in a confidential manner?

Confidential consultations about sexual harassment, assault and/or misconduct are available from persons who, by law, have special professional status. At Stanford University, a Stanford student may contact the following offices for confidential advice and help:

Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS)
(650) 723-3785
http://vaden.stanford.edu/caps/

Faculty & Staff Help Center
(650) 723-4577
helpcenter@stanford.edu

Office for Religious Life
(650) 723-1762
religious-life@stanford.edu

YWCA Sexual Assault Center at Stanford
24-hr crisis hotline
(650) 725-9955

What safety measures and accommodations are available to a student when she or he reports a Title IX related incident?

Upon a report of a Title IX concern, the University will work with the Impacted Party to put interim measures in place to create some immediate distance between the Impacted Party and accused student (or students).  Following an investigation and a determination that conduct prohibited by Title IX occurred, more permanent accommodations and safety measures may be implemented.  Accommodations and safety measures (including interim measures) could include:

  • Housing reassignments
  • Class reassignments
  • No contact letters
  • Limitation on extracurricular or athletic activities
  • Removal from University community
  • Other appropriate actions as necessary

Whom can a student contact to ask that one or more of these safety measures and/or accommodations are put in place?

A Stanford student may contact the Office of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse Education and Response (SARA), a Residence Dean, a Graduate Life Dean and/or the Title IX Coordinator.

What is the purpose of a Title IX Investigation?

The purpose of a Title IX Investigation is to determine:

  • Whether Prohibited Conduct has occurred;
  • Whether there is an ongoing risk of harm for further Prohibited Conduct and if so, to take steps to prevent its recurrence;
  • Whether accommodations for the Impacted Party need to be put in place to redress the effects of Prohibited Conduct;
  • Whether accommodations or safety measures should be put in place to make the Stanford community safe;
  • Whether the conduct warrants review by the Office of Community Standards if such review has not been initiated; and
  • Whether system-wide or local changes to policies, practices or training should be considered and implemented.

How is the Dean's Alternate Misconduct Review Process (ARP) different from a Title IX Investigation?

A Title IX Investigation is an administrative (non-disciplinary) process. The purpose is to determine whether the Title IX prohibited conduct has occurred and to take appropriate administrative steps to redress the situation.  An ARP investigation is a disciplinary process that is conducted by the Office of Community Standards, which focuses on the imposition of discipline for individual students found responsible of violating the Fundamental Standard or a University Policy. As a general rule, the Impacted Party initiates an ARP investigation. To avoid duplicative investigations, the Title IX Coordinator will generally defer to the findings from an ARP panel.

Where can I learn more about the Title IX Investigation/Grievance Administrative Policy and Procedures (non-disciplinary)?

You can learn more by clicking the following link:  Title IX Investigation/Grievance Administrative Policy and Procedures (non-disciplinary) or by contacting Sallie Kim, Interim Title IX Coordinator, at (650) 497-4955 or titleix@stanford.edu.

What are a student’s rights if she or he is accused of committing Title IX prohibited conduct?

If a University office or administrator notifies a student that they have been accused of sexual harassment, assault and/or misconduct, the accused student has the right to:

  • Know who is making the allegations
  • Know what the allegations are; and
  • Have an opportunity to respond to the allegations.

Whom can a student contact if she or he has been accused of Title IX prohibited conduct?

A student who has been accused of Title IX prohibited conduct can contact the Office of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse Education and Response (SARA), a Residence Dean, a Graduate Life Dean, and/or the Title IX Coordinator.